If/Then – the Norwegian Adaptation

Music: Tom Kitt
Original book and lyrics: Brian Yorkey
Norwegian lyrics: Ola E. Bø and Erlend Loe
Director: Marit Moum Aune

The poster for "Tenk om"I remember hearing a lot of buzz about the musical If/Then by Kitt and Yorkey when it opened on Broadway in spring 2014, and although it received mixed reviews I was quite intrigued. The story is one of chance and how these chances can lead your life in a number of different ways. If/Then’s official site offers the following synopsis:

“Elizabeth, a woman rebuilding her life in New York City, discovers a world of infinite possibilities.  In one moment, Elizabeth will lead parallel lives.
If/Then is the story of both.”

Norway is the first European country to stage the musical, and it is Det Norske Teateret (The Norwegian Theatre) who’s had the honour of putting up the show. The theatre is known for putting up Norwegian-speaking plays only, so clearly this version is a translated one, and it’s also been adapted for the Norwegian audience, in terms of names, references and setting. The original play is very New York-centered, and I’ve read some discussions on American forums that people have even been concerned about its touring potential outside New York City, will it have the same appeal outside the Big Apple?

I have to admit I’m always a bit skeptical about seeing translated versions of musicals, and in Norway it’s always a bit 50/50 if something will be translated or not. With The Norwegian Theatre I know everything is in good hands though. I’ve seen Sweeney Todd there previously, which was fantastic although translated and changed up quite a bit from the English-speaking versions I know of. It’s a fantastic theatre with some amazing people working there, cast and creatives. I therefore had quite high hopes today as a friend and I headed down to see it for the first time.

In If/Then’s case, or Tenk om in Norwegian, the changes are quite big from the original New York-version, but I found that it really works. Admittedly, I haven’t seen the Broadway version, but I’ve listened to the soundtrack and know the story, so I do feel I have some ground for comparison. In the Norwegian version of the show we find ourselves in the city of Oslo, Norway’s capital, and we follow Marianne, whose life could have gone two different ways depending on a small choice one ordinary day. In the two different paths Marianne is now “Mari” or “Anne”.

Picture of Heidi Gjerdmundsen Broch as the lead character.

Heidi Gjermundsen Broch is incredible as the lead character Mari/Anne.

The Oslo-setting feels very natural, and as an Oslo-citizen myself I found myself really appreciating all the references and love for the city, and never once was I thinking “you can tell this was actually made for New York”. The translators and director have done a great job making everything work for a different kind of audience than the original show was intended for, something which is a hard task indeed. What is really similar both in the original and adaptation is the thoroughly urban feel, and the freshness of a truly modern musical. Here you have modern everyday problems, diverse characters you can relate to and feel for and everything feels very real. And all this is especially brought out with the excellent performance of the lead characters and ensemble.

Heidi Gjermundsen Broch plays the lead character, the role that was originated by Idina Menzel on Broadway. Big shoes to follow many would say, but I’m actually going to go as far and say that I prefer what I saw and heard of Heidi live, than how Menzel is on the soundtrack and clips I’ve seen. Of course, Idina is AMAZING, and it’s an unfair comparison seeing as I haven’t seen her live, but Heidi has such an amazing voice, stage presence and charisma, that is quite simply one of the best I’ve witnessed. The leading role of this show is a big challenge, as you’re practically in every scene, playing two different versions of the same character, and you have some big numbers to belt out. Broch did this and more, and at the same time truly excelled in the more intimate, emotional scenes as well, and at times left me teary-eyed.

I really did enjoy the musical score throughout the show, but it’s not exactly that type of musical which has tunes you immediately catch on to, and start humming to the minute you leave the theatre. There are some wonderful duets, big emotional ballads, impressive ensemble numbers and more, but I have to admit most of them are not something I’d listen to a lot just to enjoy the music, they work more as a part of the show, and not so much on their own. This is of course a very subjective opinion, as I know a lot of people love the soundtrack and listen to it frequently.

All in all, I liked the show a lot. The amazing performances and the freshness of the modern setting are the true highlights, and a musical that’s been criticized for being “too New York” to succeed anywhere else has surely proven its adaptability by getting great reviews from the Norwegian press. The Norwegian writers have truly done a great job handling the story and presenting it in a slightly different way, which will hopefully be an inspiration to other theatres throughout the world to do the same.

 

Films watched in 2015: Part 3

September, October, November and December.

A collage of some of the films watched in 2015

A period defined by lots of school work, lots of job hours, exams, traveling to Prague and of course Christmas. Compared to the two previous periods this is the one where I’ve checked the least films, but still managed to get up to the count of 35. Not too bad! In early autumn my boyfriend and I started our “B-movie”-period, which I’ve blogged about previously. Later in the year I also saw more Chaplin films for the first time, having only seen “The Kid” before. My boyfriend came home one day with the complete box-set of Charlie Chaplin films, so even though we watched quite a few already there will be plenty more to explore!

At the movies I saw the Norwegian film “The Wave”, “The Martian” and of course, this year’s most anticipated film: “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”. “The Martian” was quite entertaining, although how it is nominated for 7 Oscars I will never understand. Now “Star Wars” I absolutely loved. I came in with mixed anticipations, but ended up very pleased, despite its flaws it was a very good film, and absolutely worthy of the Star Wars universe.

I also FINALLY watched some great classics, both old and not quite that old, such as “The Shawshank Redemption”, “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Hamlet” (1948), all great films.

Films watched: 35
Most watched director: Charlie Chaplin (4)
Favourites: The Great Dictator, Star Wars – The Force Awakens, Killer Klowns from Outer Space, 2001: A Space Odyssey
Watched at the movies: The Wave, The Martian, Star Wars: The Force Awakens

The following is a list of the films I watched in September, October, November and December 2015. The list does not include films I’ve seen before. To keep track of the films I watch I use ICheckMovies, which is highly recommended 🙂

  1. Inside Llewyn Davis – Ethan Coen and Joel Coen
  2. Bølgen (The Wave) – Roar Uthaug
  3. Dallas Buyers Club – Jean Marc Vallée
  4. Annabelle – John R. Leonetti
  5. The Conjuring – James Wan
  6. Army of Darkness – Sam Raimi
  7. 2001: A Space Odyssey – Stanley Kubrick
  8. Young Frankenstein – Mel Brooks
  9. Robinson Crusoe on Mars – Byron Haskin
  10. The War of the Worlds – Byron Haskin
  11. Barbarella – Roger Vadim
  12. Dracula – Terence Fisher
  13. The Beast from 20.000 Fathoms – Eugène Lourié
  14. Killer Klowns from Outer Space – Stephen Chiodo
  15. Forbidden Planet – Fred M. Wilcox
  16. The Hound of the Baskervilles – Terence Fisher
  17. Leprechaun – Mark Jones
  18. Inside Out – Pete Docter and Ronnie Del Carmen
  19. My Neighbour Totoro – Hayao Miyazaki
  20. Reprise – Joachim Trier
  21. Howl’s Moving Castle – Hayao Miyazaki
  22. Hamlet – Laurence Olivier
  23. The Martian – Ridley Scott
  24. The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover – Peter Greenaway
  25. Star Trek: Into Darkness – J.J. Abrams
  26. The Great Dictator – Charlie Chaplin
  27. The Gold Rush – Charlie Chaplin
  28. City Lights – Charlie Chaplin
  29. Limelight – Charlie Chaplin
  30. The Aviator – Martin Scorsese
  31. Sherlock Jr. – Buster Keaton
  32. Black Christmas – Bob Clark
  33. Silent Night, Deadly Night – Charles E. Sellier Jr.
  34. The Shawshank Redemption – Frank Darabont
  35. Star Wars: The Force Awakens – J.J. Abrams

The Revenant (2015) – Film Review

The Revenant - Movie poster

© 2015 – Twentieth Century Fox. Image used under fair use.

The Revenant (2015)
Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu
Written by Mark L. Smith and Alejandro González Iñárritu

Imdb summary: A frontiersman on a fur trading expedition in the 1820s fights for survival after being mauled by a bear and left for dead by members of his own hunting team.

Last Sunday night my boyfriend and I watched “The Revenant” at the movies, and before I say anything else I just have to say: This is definitively a film where you choose the cinematic experience, DO NOT download some low quality DVD-rip and watch it on your computer. If you want to see as many Oscar-nominated films as possible before the ceremony, this is the one you choose, it would be a sin to not watch this in the best quality and surroundings as possible. I simply have to gush over the stunning visuals before I move on to the story itself.

As you have probably gathered, this is simply a beautiful visual experience. Watching “The Revenant” was almost like watching a very high quality nature documentary and feature film combined, the film takes its time to let you enjoy the beautiful scenery. The film was shot using almost exclusively using natural light, which absolutely paid off, even though it made the filming period a lot longer (only so much light during the day) as the beautiful snowy scenes really came into their own in the wonderful cold and bright winter sun. When watching you get the feel that the surroundings and setting is as much part of the story as the events that are unfolding there, and cinematographer Lubezki treats them with great respect. An Oscar nomination well deserved! The same can be said for editor Stephen Mirrione, who seamlessly sews it all together, adding to the sense that story and setting are one.

A shot of Leonardo DiCaprio in "The Revenant"

“The Revenant” is a stunning visual experience

One of the most talked about scenes in the film is the bear-attack, and again I’m full of praise. For the past few years no matter how far we’ve come regarding CGI, it just doesn’t look 100% right when you have something or someone computer made interacting with a real human character in the same scene, especially when it’s a close interaction like touching and fighting. This is not the case with “The Revenant”. I have no idea how they did it, but that attack scene looks completely real. It’s worth the talk, it’s worth the hype, it’s worth the praise! I know it’s CGI, but something inside me is still a little convinced they just let a bear loose on DiCaprio, and that he willingly let them. I mean, if you let a bear almost kill you, you have to win that Oscar!

When saying that the plot it self is the weakest part of the whole film, it’s by no means an insult to the story, just again a proof of how amazing the visuals and acting are. They are the strongest points, but the story is also gripping, intense and never leaves you bored. Before watching a film that’s over 150 minutes long you’re always a bit apprehensive, and lately it seems like almost all big new releases have to be around this playtime, and frankly, in most cases 120 is enough. I was never bored for a minute though, even though the film is by no means action-packed throughout or moving high-speed through everything. It takes its time, but does so beautifully. I know there are divided views about the plot, and I can understand some of the reservations some have, because yes: a lot of the happenings in “The Revenant” are quite far fetched, and even though it’s inspired by true events there is a lot elements, some quite unrealistic, added to the film. I don’t mind myself, but I understand that people enjoy storytelling in different ways, and that type of realism is more important in some camps than other. My own justification of the “far-fetchedness” of it all is that this film sets out to tell the ultimate survival story, and I’ll accept a bit of difference in the physical laws in our own world and in this epic movie world. Though, the characters could maybe have tried just a tad harder to stay away from the water when it’s freezing around them and there’s nowhere to dry their clothes.. But details, details.

I quickly mentioned that the acting is great in this film, and I truly believe that this if finally DiCaprio’s time to win that Oscar statuette. Although his actual spoken dialogue is scarce, he does so much through, and of course, acting is so much more than just speaking lines. I truly felt his anger, hurt, pain and emotions, and above all, I truly felt cold. I am yet to see all the nominees for Best Actor this year, but so far Leo is my bet and hope! Tom Hardy also does a brilliant job as John Fitzgerald, the unsympathetic antagonist, and does not represent him as a one-note character, though we may not like him that much it’s also possible to understand his actions throughout the film. Also a nomination well deserved, though Hardy is in my opinion rivaled by Mark Rylance’s great performance in “Bridge of Spies”.

In conclusion, The Revenant is truly one of, if not the greatest films of 2015, especially in the visual department. It’s a truly epic story of survival that at times may require some suspension of disbelief, but its few weak points are saved by the brilliant actors and the always present stunning cinematography. It’s definitively a film worth seeing, and worthy of a true cinematic experience.

Films watched in 2015: Part 2

 

The Evil Dead, Moonrise Kingdom, Lawrence of Arabia and Ex Machina

The Evil Dead, Moonrise Kingdom, Lawrence of Arabia and Ex Machina

May, June, July and August.

This period was a wonderful mix of old classics, horror movies, older and new. Though very few films from the year 2015, I think only Jurassic World and Ex-Machina if I remember correctly. Jurassic World was unfortunately quite forgettable and tame, but Ex-Machina was absolutely wonderful, one of the best films of the year. Such an original story, ad it is a beautiful film to look at, it’s just absurd how it hasn’t been nominated for best cinematography in this year’s Academy Awards. It is an especially impressive film considering that this was Alex Garland’s directorial debut!

May of 2015 also introduced me to the Evil Dead-series, which I’m now a big fan of! I love cheesy comedy horror, if it’s properly tongue-in-cheek. We also watched the the French-Polish “Three Colours trilogy” by director Krzysztof Kieślowski, which was very good, especially the first one, “Blue” with Juliette Binoche.

Hitchcock continues to dominate among the directors of films watched in the May – August time span, though the period also introduced me to other greats such as Woody Allen who I (shockingly) have not watched anything by previously.

Films watched: 40
Most watched director: Alfred Hitchcock (5), Krzysztof Kieslowski (3), Woody Allen (3)
Favourites: Ex Machina, The Evil Dead & II, Moonrise Kingdom, Lawrence of Arabia
Watched at the movies: Jurassic World

The following is a list of the films I watched in May, June, July and August 2015. The list does not include films I’ve seen before. To keep track of the films I watch I use ICheckMovies, which is highly recommended 🙂

  1. The Cabin in the Woods – Drew Goddard
  2. The Evil Dead- Sam Raimi
  3. Evil Dead II – Sam Raimi
  4. Singin’ in the Rain – Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly
  5. Skyfall – Sam Mendes
  6. Match Point – Woody Allen
  7. Moonrise Kingdom – Wes Anderson
  8. The Trial – Orson Welles
  9. The Searchers – John Ford
  10. Heavenly Creatures – Peter Jackson
  11. Picnic at Hanging Rock – Peter Weir
  12. Ex Machina – Alex Garland
  13. Vicky Christina Barcelona – Woody Allen
  14. Poltergeist – Tobe Hooper
  15. Annie Hall – Woody Allen
  16. The Apartment – Billy Wilder
  17. Lawrence of Arabia – David Lean
  18. All Quiet on the Western Front – Lewis Milestone
  19. Dial M for Murder – Alfred Hitchcock
  20. Rear Window – Alfred Hitchcock
  21. Jurassic World – Colin Trevorrow
  22. Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me – David Lych
  23. The Killing – Stanley Kubrick
  24. Fargo – Joel Coen and Ethan Coel
  25. Black Swan – Darren Aronofsky
  26. Brief Encounter – David Lean
  27. Vertigo – Alfred Hitchcock
  28. Blade Runner – Ridley Scott
  29. Trois couleurs: Bleu – Krzysztof Kieslowski
  30. Trois couleurs: Blanc – Krzysztof Kieslowski
  31. Trois couleurs: Rouge – Krzysztof Kieslowski
  32. Se7en – David Fincher
  33. The Birds – Hitchcock
  34. Kind Hearts and Coronets – Robert Hamer
  35. Intouchables –     Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano
  36. If…. – Lindsay Anderson
  37. The 39 Steps – Alfred Hitchcock
  38. Sweet Smell of Success – Alexander Mackendrick
  39. Fantastic Mr. Fox – Wes Anderson
  40. Gravity – Alfonso Cuarón

Films watched in 2015: Part 1

When I started putting this list together, I quickly realised I had to divide this in to more parts. I watch quite a lot of films, and at the end of the year it’s fun to look back and see what type of films I’ve watched, has there been a theme, are certain directors more present than others, and so on. Reviewing my “I-checks” for January, February, March and April, I clearly started the year by catching up on as many Oscar-nomitated films as possible, as is the situation this year.

Further out in February and March my boyfriend and I had our “great film period”, before we moved in together we were catsitting my aunt’s cats and living in her house for a month, and took advantage of the huge HD-TV to watch a lot of films. The theme is quite clear, I was being introduced to a lot of old classics, most of which I loved. You can cleary see some directors being listed several times..

We ended the first third of 2015 by going to the movies and seeing It Follows, which I truly think is one of the best modern horror films, and truly recommend!

Stats:
Films watched: 44
Most watched director: Alfred Hitchcock (6) and Billy Wilder (5).
Favourites: Sunset Blvd, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Psycho, 12 Angry Men and It Follows.
Watched at the movies: The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, Adieu au langage, Into the Woods, It Follows.

The following is a list of the films I watched in January, February, March and April 2015. The list does not include films I’ve seen before. To keep track of the films I watch I use ICheckMovies, which is highly recommended 🙂

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared – Felix Herngren
Big Hero 6 – Chris Williams, Don Hall
The Princess Bride – Rob Reiner
Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) – Alejandro G. Iñárritu
To Kill A Mockingbird – Robert Mulligan
Boyhood – Richard Linklater
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Wes Anderson
How to Train Your Dragon 2 – Dean DeBlois
The Theory of Everything – James Marsh
Serenity – Joss Whedon
Adieu au langage – Jean-Luc Godard
Slither – James Gunn
Groundhog Day – Harold Ramis
Sunset Blvd. – Billy Wilder
Roman Holiday – William Wyler
The Other Boleyn Girl – Justin Chadwick
Sabrina – Billy Wilder
Charade – Stanley Donen
Some Like It Hot – Billy Wilder
Psycho – Alfred Hitchcock
The Grapes of Wrath –John Ford
Rebecca – Alfred Hitchcock
Witness for the Prosecution – Billy Wilder
North by Northwest – Alfred Hitchcock
The Lost Weekend – Billy Wilder
The Innocents – Jack Clayton
The Princess and the Frog – Ron Clements and John Musker
Prisoners – Denis Villeneuve
In the Heat of the Night – Norman Jewison
Into to the Woods – Rob Marshall
Big Fish – Tim Burton
Prometheus – Ridley Scott
Taxi Driver – Martin Scorsese
Star Trek – J. J Abrams
Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht – Werner Herzog
To Catch a Thief – Alfred Hitchcock
Spellbound – Alfred Hitchcock
Peeping Tom – Michael Powell
Shadow of the Vampire – E. Elias Merhige
Barton Fink – Ethan Coen and Joel Cohen
Paths of Glory – Stanley Kubrick
Frenzy – Alfred Hitchcock
12 Angry Men – Sidney Lumet
It Follows – David Robert Mitchell

 

What I read in 2015

East of Eden

Steinbeck’s East of Eden – A new favourite!

Okey, so.. ages since my last post. Let’s just ignore that!

2016 is here! Alright, 2016 was here 19 days ago, but it’s still January, so I feel I can justify making a “what was 2015 like”-blog post. Starting off with books read in 2015! I thought I’d also make a similar list concerning films I’ve watched the last, which will be up this week as well.

I think two authors really defined my book year of 2015: John Steinbeck and Norwegian author Jon Michelet with his currently four books in the series A Hero of the Sea (title translated freely by me, En sjøens helt in Norwegian). Michelet’s story revolves around the Norwegian war sailors, concerning both cargo and military ships. Unfortunately they have not been translated to English (yet?), so you’d have to be able to understand Norwegian to read them.

Steinbeck is, among Michelet, my most read author this year, with 4 titles. As I’ve read more of his works he has become one of my favourite writers, and I actually started 2016 by reading one of his greatest works, Grapes of Wrath. One of his works actually became the topic for one of my semester assignments; The Moon is Down from 1942. Always fun when you can write about something you like for school!

Stats:
New books read: 36
Most read author: John Steinbeck and Jon Michelet
Most disappointing
: Funny Girl – Nick Hornby and Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford.
New Favourites: The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway, East of Eden – John Steinbeck, The Short History of Nearly Everything – Bill Bryson and Apology by Plato.
Best non-fiction: The Short History of Nearly Everything – Bill Bryson and Apology – Plato.
Least memorable (but not necessarily bad): Elizabeth is Missing – Emma Healy, Mobile Library – David Whitehouse and The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
Best Children’s Book: Tonje Glimmerdal by Maria Parr.

All in all I read 36 books in 2015, not counting rereads of titles I’ve read before. The following is a list of all 36 sorted by reading date, and with the rating I gave it on Goodreads. For the works that only have a Norwegian title I’ve included my own translations.

Jon Michelet – Skogsmatrosen (The forest sea man) 5/5 stars
Nick Hornby – Funny Girl 2/5 stars
Kjell Askildsen Thomas F’s siste nedtegnelser til almenheten (Thomas F’s last records for the public – short stories) 4/5 stars
Amy Poehler – Yes Please 3/5 stars
David Whitehouse – Mobile Library 3/5 stars
Jon Michelet – Skytteren (The marksman) 4/5 stars
Hugh Howey – Wool (Silo #1) 3/5 stars
Carl Frode Tiller – Innsirkling (Circling) 4/5 stars
Author unknown – Lazarillo de Tormes 4/5 stars
Muriel Barbery – The Elegance of the Hedgehog 4/5 stars
H.G. Wells – The War of the Worlds 4/5 stars
Rainbow Rowell – Eleanor and Park 3/5 stars
J.D. Salinger – The Catcher in the Rye 4/5 stars
Jon Michelet – Gullgutten (The Golden Boy) 4/5 stars
Emma Healey – Elizabeth is Missing 3/5 stars
Gabrielle Zevin – The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry 3/5 stars
Jamie Ford – Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet 2/5 stars
Harper Lee – Go Set A Watchman 4/5 stars
Ernest Hemingway – The Old Man and the Sea 5/5 stars
John Boyne – The Boy in the Striped Pajamas 3/5 stars
John Steinbeck – East of Eden 5/5 stars
John Steinbeck – The Pearl 4/5 stars
Edgar Allan Poe – The Murders in the Rue Morgue 3/5 stars
Edgar Allan Poe – The Tell-Tale Heart 5/5 stars
Bjørn Ousland – Sydover – Kappløpet mot Sydpolen (Southbound – The Race to the South Pole) 3/5 stars
Plato – Apology 5/5 stars
Bill Bryson – A Short History of Nearly Everything 5/5 stars
Maria Parr – Tonje Glimmerdal 4/5 stars
Hanne Ørstavik – The Blue Room 4/5 stars
Jojo Moyes – After You 4/5 stars
Gunnar Tjomlid – Placebodefekten (The Placebo Defect) 4/5 stars
John Steinbeck – The Red Pony 4/5 stars
Neil Gaiman – American Gods 4/5 stars
John Steinbeck – The Moon is Down 5/5 stars
Jon Michelet – Blodige strender (Bloodstained Beaches) 4/5 stars
Caitlin Moran – How To Be A Woman 3/5 stars

Looking back it’s been quite a varied book year with a lot of highlights, but also a few disappointments. Unfortunately one of the latter was the work of one of my favourite authors; Nick Hornby. Funny Girl turned out to be boring girl.. Sorry Nick, but I’m still looking forward to your next one!

So bad they’re good – B-movies galore

collage of postersRecently my boyfriend and I have been watching a lot of so-called B-movies. Something just got into the both of us after watching Army of Darkness a few weeks back, and since that we decided to just continue on that path for a little while. We’ve watched a lot of old sci-fi and/or horror movies that are often referred to as b-movies, a lot of them in the category “so bad it’s good” and some “so bad it’s just bad”. And some are just plain good films.

I thought I’d make a quick list of the films we have watched so far, but I’m sure it will expand in the future. We have a lot of titles remaining to be seen! I will only post my short opinion here, and mostly won’t include a summary or description, as some of these will have their own blog-post dedicated to a full review later. If you want to find out more about the plot or information about the film, click on the title and it will lead you to the film’s IMDB-page.

I would also love some tips on what to check out next based on the things we have seen, so if you have any ideas, please leave a comment 🙂

Army of Darkness (1992) – First thoughts: Oh my god, it’s Miss Honey! That is WEIRD! Otherwise, loved it as I loved the other Evil Dead-films. They increase in silliness with each film, but in a good way. THE series to watch if you want a comedy-horror film.

Young Frankenstein (1974) – This was a really fun film! Basically, it’s about a younger family member of the original Frankenstein, tired of always being compared to his infamous relative and determined not to follow in his footsteps, but end up doing EXACTLY so. Just in a more comical and absurd way. Gene Wilder is funny as always in the title role, but this films TRUE star is Marty Feldman as Igor.

Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964) – The title of this film is just.. Well.. What can you say? I was a bit let down by this, as it’s actually a bit more serious than the title leads you to believe. I was expecting something completely stupid, goofy and laughable, but unfortunately it was mostly stupid and boring. There’s a cute monkey though, so you have that.

The War of the Worlds (1953) – Actually a bit unsure if this is considered a b-movie or not. I thought it would be before watching it, but it was a lot more high-budget and high-tech than I expected. The set and effects are quite impressive, but unfortunately the film itself is quite dull. I think it would have been more interesting had they stayed closer to the original story. Quite a forgettable film.

Barbarella (1968) – The “classic” Barbarella. I’m actually not even sure what to think of this film. It’s just SO weird. Good weird or bad weird? I can’t decide! I certainly laughed at parts, but it also felt longer than the 98 minutes it took to watch it. It is “the ultimate b-movie” for a lot of people, and certainly the sexiest. I don’t think I’ll be tempted to re-watch it any time soon though.

Dracula (1958) – Christopher Lee! Peter Cushing! I loved this, and it also surprised me a lot. It actually changes quite a lot from the original Dracula-story, but it stays true to its spirit, and Cushing is BRILLIANT as Van Helsing! One of my favourites of the films we saw! Will have to check out some of the sequels (there are A LOT)!

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) – This was quite forgettable I’m afraid. It’s a standard monster-movie, but what’s cool about The Beast is that it’s basically almost like Godzilla, but this came first by a year! The plot revolves around a frozen dinosaur waking up to life, he’s pissed and wants to rampage a city. Sound cool, but turned out quite boring. The last five minutes are the highlight of the whole film.

Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) – I.LOVE.THIS! They are clowns. They come from outer space. And they just wanna kill people! With popcorn guns, cotton candy and pies! How can you not love it? This movie embraces the “so bad it’s good”-idea to the fullest, I even think the acting is bad on purpose. Or they went out of their way to find bad actors (sorry). Anyway, IT’S THE BEST, YOU HAVE TO SEE IT!

Forbidden Planet (1956) – This turned out to be something completely different from what I expected, but I quite liked it. The plot surprised me, mostly in a good way. It’s not a goofy movie as one might think from the poster, although it has its goofy moments, it’s actually takes almost a philosophical approach to its themes. A recommended watch!

The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959) – Decided to watch this as we liked Dracula so much, and here we have the brilliant trio of Fisher (director), Lee and Cushing again. This wasn’t quite as good as Dracula, but it was an okay watch, and my first old Sherlock-movie. Big surprise in the film: Lee plays a good guy! What is this!? Nice to see for a change though, and although the film itself wasn’t that interesting, the actors are great.

Leprechaun (1993) – Watched this in hope that it would be kind of like Killer Klowns; completely ridiculous and hilarious, but our hopes were not met. The concept of an evil murderous leprechaun seeking vengeance for his stolen gold sounds cool, but it turned out too stupid and without the fun-stupid parts. And this film has 6 sequels! I don’t think I’ll be watching any of them, although the title Leprechaun 4: In Space (Leprechaun: Back 2 tha Hood is another good one) sound awfully tempting.

As mentioned, I’d love to hear what your favourites in the genre are, I’m always looking for what to explore next 🙂