American Gods – Neil Gaiman

Cover of American GodsRead from October 4th to October 15th.
American Gods on Goodreads.

I finished reading American Gods last night around 1:30 AM, the last few chapters made it absolutely impossible to go to sleep. And that’s everything I’m going to say about the ending.

I feel like I’m reading this book years after everyone else, and I don’t really know what took me so long. I’d heard a lot of good things, so I bought it a few months back and finally started reading it 11 days ago. For those of you who don’t know anything about the book, I’ll try to explain in a few words: American Gods is an urban fantasy novel, and the story takes place in the modern-day United States. Living among the American people are all the gods brought to the country (through the minds, worshipping and prayers of the people coming to America) over the years, now most of them forgotten. Our protagonist, Shadow, finds himself suddenly involved in this world with the old Gods from ancient worlds and the new, representing the media, drugs and so on. The old god who calls himself Wednesday recruits Shadow to his services for the oncoming storm, the war between the old gods and the new.

However, describing what the story is about says very little about what sort of book this actually is. American Gods is quite unlike any other fantasy novel I’ve read, although I have to admit I’ve never explored the urban fantasy genre much. It is of course much more different than Percy Jackson for example, although one can draw similarities between the modern setting and the use of ancient mythology. Do not compare the two in style however, the former is a much more raw and gritty experience, and of course, probably aimed at an older audience. The themes are quite adult and the language at times explicit, describing sexual and violent scenes. And describing them well I dare say.

At times American Gods feels like reading a “great American road trip” novel, you have “the boys” riding around, some great descriptions of the country, and the sort of raw and unrefined style of that “traditional macho”(in lack of a better word) genre. You sort of forget that you’re reading what is actually a fantasy novel, but then something extraordinary happens and you’re almost violently reminded.

The story itself I found extremely well designed, and the language suits the feel of everything very well, making the characters feel real. The only negative opinion I have regarding the book, is that it just felt a bit too long at times, especially about midway some aspects were just drawn out and could have been cut completely. I did read the author’s preferred text though, which I believe is quite a bit longer than the originally published novel. I can see how Gaiman wanted to include as much as he possibly could to fully flesh out his wonderfully thought of world, but some of it felt just a bit unnecessary. Overall though, American Gods is in my opinion a very good and entertaining read, which I fully recommend.

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